Two UC Berkeley scholars elected to America’s oldest learned society

BERKELEY —

Two University of California, Berkeley, scholars have been elected to the American Philosophical Society (APS), along with 36 other scientists, artists, historians and performers, including Woody Allen.

The APS is the oldest leaned society in the country, founded by Benjamin Franklin in 1743. The new members were announced April 24, bringing total membership in the society to 1,001.

The new UC Berkeley members are:

Leslie Kurke, Richard and Rhoda Goldman Distinguished Professor in the departments of classics and comparative literature

John R. Searle, Willis S. and Marion Slusser Professor of Philosophy

Aside from Allen, an award-winner screenwriter, film director and actor, the new members also include New Yorker cartoonist Roz Chast; the director of New York’s Museum of Modern Art, Glenn Lowry; U.S. Appeals Court judge Michael Boudin; and Cass Sunstein, administrator of the White House Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs.

The list also includes three other UC faculty members: Zachary Fisk, Distinguished Professor of Physics and Astronomy at UC Irvine; Jack E. Dixon, professor of pharmacology, cellular and molecular medicine, chemistry and biochemistry at UC San Diego; and Fred H. Gage, professor of neurosciences at UC San Diego.

The society promotes useful knowledge in the sciences and humanities through excellence in scholarly research, professional meetings, publications, library resources and community outreach, according to the organization’s Web site.

The total number of current and emeritus UC Berkeley faculty members who are APS members is now 40.

For a complete list of new members, link to the APS Web site.