Health & medicine archive

Blocking hormone could eliminate stress-induced infertility

Blocking hormone could eliminate stress-induced infertility

January 12, 2015:

Berkeley scientists show that the effects of chronic stress on fertility persist long after the stress is gone. This is because a hormone that suppresses fertility, GnIH, remains high even after stress hormone levels return to normal. In rats, they successfully blocked the hormone gene and restored normal reproductive behavior, suggesting therapeutic potential for stressed humans and animals in captive breeding programs.

Kids sleep less when smartphones are nearby, study finds

Kids sleep less when smartphones are nearby, study finds January 6, 2015:

A study led by a UC Berkeley researcher finds that children who slept in the same room as small screens such as smartphones got almost 21 fewer minutes of shuteye a night than those who didn’t. The findings contribute to a growing body of evidence that electronic gadgets in the bedroom interfere with sleep.

Berkeley researchers develop new standard for sharing neuroscience data

Berkeley researchers develop new standard for sharing neuroscience data December 19, 2014:

Berkeley Lab researchers have developed a computational framework for standardizing neuroscience data to assist data sharing among neuroscientists worldwide, much as the jpeg and TIFF standards have made sharing digital images easy. The researchers are part of the UC Berkeley, Berkeley Lab and UCSF partnership called BRAINSeed.

UC’s first crop of ‘global food’ fellows includes three Berkeley students

UC’s first crop of ‘global food’ fellows includes three Berkeley students December 10, 2014:

Three UC Berkeley students are among 54 fellows announced Dec. 9 by the University of California’s Global Food Initiative, launched earlier this year to address food security, health and sustainability issues.

New therapy holds promise for restoring vision

New therapy holds promise for restoring vision December 8, 2014:

A new genetic therapy developed by UC Berkeley scientists has not only helped blind mice regain light sensitivity sufficient to distinguish flashing from non-flashing lights, but also restored light response to the retinas of dogs, setting the stage for future clinical trials of the therapy in humans. The therapy involves inserting photoswitches into retinal cells that are normally “blind.”

Project uses tech to help boost vaccination rates in India

Project uses tech to help boost vaccination rates in India December 2, 2014:

As part of a project called Emmunify, students at UC Berkeley are simplifying medical record-keeping by storing patient vaccination records on a portable chip. The goal of the project is to make it easier for healthcare providers to access patient records without the need for Internet access, and ultimately to boost vaccination rates in developing nations.

Greater income inequality linked to more deaths for black Americans

Greater income inequality linked to more deaths for black Americans December 1, 2014:

Income inequality matters for everyone, but it matters differently for different groups of people, conclude the authors of a new UC Berkeley study. Researchers linked greater gaps in wealth to more deaths among black Americans, but fewer deaths among white Americans.

Diana Bautista receives Young Investigator Award from neuroscience society

Diana Bautista receives Young Investigator Award from neuroscience society November 17, 2014:

The Society for Neuroscience presented a Young Investigator Award to Diana Bautista, UC Berkeley assistant professor of integrative biology, at its annual meeting Nov. 17 in Washington, DC. The $15,000 award recognizes outstanding achievements and contributions by young neuroscientists who have recently received advanced professional degree.

Helping parents navigate the ‘New Puberty’ for today’s girls

Helping parents navigate the ‘New Puberty’ for today’s girls November 6, 2014:

What happens when a girl has the mind of an 8-year-old and the body of a 13-year-old? Girls today are developing faster and entering puberty earlier than ever before. Julianna Deardorff, a UC Berkeley expert in adolescent health and co-author of The New Puberty, discusses this trend, and how parents can deal with it.