Health & medicine archive

Study finds hazardous flame retardants in preschool, childcare settings

Study finds hazardous flame retardants in preschool, childcare settings May 15, 2014:

A new study led by UC Berkeley researchers finds that flame retardants are prevalent indoors in preschools and daycare centers, potentially exposing young children to chemicals known to be hazardous.

Polar bear genome gives new insight into adaptations to high-fat diet

Polar bear genome gives new insight into adaptations to high-fat diet May 8, 2014:

The polar bear diverged from the brown bear, or grizzly, as recently as several hundred thousand years ago, according to a genome comparison by UC Berkeley, Chinese and Danish researchers. They pinpointed genes involved in fat metabolism that could provide insights that will help humans deal with health problems caused by high-fat diets.

Relay for Life cancer fundraiser comes to campus April 26

Relay for Life cancer fundraiser comes to campus April 26 March 19, 2014:

Relay for Life, an annual team walkathon to raise money to fight cancer, returns to the UC Berkeley campus April 26. In the past 5 years alone, the event has raised over a quarter of a million dollars.

Map of fruit fly’s active genes has implications for understanding stress

Map of fruit fly’s active genes has implications for understanding stress March 19, 2014:

A group led by scientists from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has conducted the largest survey yet of how information encoded in an animal genome is processed in different organs, stages of development and environmental conditions. Their findings about the fruit fly paint a new picture of how genes function in the nervous system and in response to environmental stress.

James Hurley receives award for work on proteins in cell membranes

James Hurley receives award for work on proteins in cell membranes March 5, 2014:

James Hurley, professor of molecular and cell biology, received the 2014 Hans Neurath Award from The Protein Society for his “ground-breaking contributions to structural membrane biology and membrane trafficking.” The award for basic research in protein science comes from the only international society promoting research on proteins.

Jennifer Doudna receives Lurie Award for gene editing breakthrough with video

Jennifer Doudna receives Lurie Award for gene editing breakthrough February 25, 2014:

Jennifer Doudna, professor of molecular and cell biology, is the 2014 recipient of the Lurie Prize in the Biomedical Sciences from the Foundation for the National Institutes of Health. Doudna, who studies what she calls “the secret life of RNA,” will receive a medal and $100,000 honorarium on May 20 in Washington, D.C.