Health & medicine archive

POV: ‘Development engineers’ take aim at global poverty

POV: ‘Development engineers’ take aim at global poverty October 6, 2014:

A new generation of development engineers, “dedicated to using engineering and technology to improve the lot of the world’s poorest people,” is emerging around the world, write Shankar Sastry and Lina Nilsson of UC Berkeley’s Blum Center for Developing Economies, in a Washington Post opinion piece.

$4.5 million for big-data projects in ecology, astronomy, microscopy

$4.5 million for big-data projects in ecology, astronomy, microscopy October 2, 2014:

The Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation has upped its support of data-driven science at UC Berkeley by awarding three professors $1.5 million each over five years to pursue big-data projects in ecology, astronomy and microscopy. The faculty members – Laura Waller, Joshua Bloom and Laurel Larsen – were named Moore Investigators in Data-Driven Discovery.

What are the health effects of fitness ‘deconditioning’?

What are the health effects of fitness ‘deconditioning’? September 24, 2014:

What happens to your fitness if you’re not able to follow your usual exercise regimen to the max? Berkeley Wellness newsletter reports the latest findings on deconditioning.

Fall flu-shot clinics begin Sept. 29

Fall flu-shot clinics begin Sept. 29 September 24, 2014:

Just in time for flu season, University Health Service is launching its fall flu-shot clinics. Get immunized at Tang on Sept. 29 or any of five more clinics scheduled through early December. No appointment necessary.

Researchers find neural compensation in people with Alzheimer’s-related protein

Researchers find neural compensation in people with Alzheimer’s-related protein September 14, 2014:

UC Berkeley researchers have found that the human brain is capable of a neural workaround that compensates for the buildup of beta-amyloid, a destructive protein associated with Alzheimer’s disease. The findings could help explain how some older adults with beta-amyloid deposits in their brain retain normal cognitive function while others develop dementia.

Bear Pantry founder, now on staff, helps feed student parents

Bear Pantry founder, now on staff, helps feed student parents August 15, 2014:

Koko Mulder was a single mom in her 40s when, as a Berkeley undergrad, she founded the Bear Pantry to help non-traditional students like herself stretch their food dollars. She heads up the pantry, now, as a campus staffer with personal knowledge of the challenges that student parents face.

Worm, fly development surprisingly similar, Berkeley study finds

Worm, fly development surprisingly similar, Berkeley study finds July 2, 2014:

Grad student Jingyi Jesscia Li, plant and microbial biology professor Steve Brenner and colleagues compared the genes activated during development in the early fruit fly and nematode (C. elegans) and found them to be surprisingly similar. Fruit flies actually use these genes twice, once during larval development and again during metamorphosis. The research is part of the modENCODE project.

Fact sheet on food/ag studies and research at UC Berkeley

Fact sheet on food/ag studies and research at UC Berkeley July 1, 2014:

UC Berkeley offers a wide array of programs and initiatives related to food and agriculture systems, encompassing many disciplines, departments, academic program areas, institutes, centers, student initiatives and services spanning the campus and the community. A fact sheet.

Jennifer Doudna shares Janssen Award for Biomedical Research with video

Jennifer Doudna shares Janssen Award for Biomedical Research June 24, 2014:

Berkeley’s Jennifer Doudna and European colleague Emmanuelle Charpentier are the winners of the 2014 Dr. Paul Janssen Award for Biomedical Research, awarded by Johnson & Johnson. Their collaboration led to the discovery of a new method for precisely manipulating genetic information in ways that should produce new insights in health and disease and may lead to new drug targets.