Science archive

Map of fruit fly’s active genes has implications for understanding stress

Map of fruit fly’s active genes has implications for understanding stress March 19, 2014:

A group led by scientists from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has conducted the largest survey yet of how information encoded in an animal genome is processed in different organs, stages of development and environmental conditions. Their findings about the fruit fly paint a new picture of how genes function in the nervous system and in response to environmental stress.

Fierce solar magnetic storm barely missed Earth in 2012 with video

Fierce solar magnetic storm barely missed Earth in 2012 March 18, 2014:

UC Berkeley physicist Janet Luhmann & former postdoc Ying Liu report that a rapid succession of coronal mass ejections – the most intense eruptions on the sun – sent a pulse of magnetized plasma barreling into space & through Earth’s orbit on July 23, 2012. Had it hit Earth, it could have disrupted the electrical grid, satellites, GPS & our increasingly electronic lives.

Colored diamonds are a superconductor’s best friend

Colored diamonds are a superconductor’s best friend March 6, 2014:

Physicists Dmitry Budker of UC Berkeley and Ron Folman of Ben-Gurion University show that color centers in diamonds, among the most sensitive magnetic sensors known today, can help researchers learn about the much ballyhooed but still mysterious high-temperature superconductors.

James Hurley receives award for work on proteins in cell membranes

James Hurley receives award for work on proteins in cell membranes March 5, 2014:

James Hurley, professor of molecular and cell biology, received the 2014 Hans Neurath Award from The Protein Society for his “ground-breaking contributions to structural membrane biology and membrane trafficking.” The award for basic research in protein science comes from the only international society promoting research on proteins.