Technology & engineering archive

Scientists take big step in making graphene a viable silicon substitute

Scientists take big step in making graphene a viable silicon substitute January 26, 2015:

New research moves the wonder material graphene a major step closer to knocking silicon off as the dominant workhorse of the electronics industry. While silicon is ubiquitous in semiconductors and integrated circuits, scientists have been eyeing graphene ­because of the ultrafast speed with which electrons can zip through the material.

Q&A: Alivisatos, Kavli directors explore future of nanoscience

Q&A: Alivisatos, Kavli directors explore future of nanoscience January 14, 2015:

In advance of the inaugural symposium Jan. 15-16 of the new Kavli Energy NanoScience Institute, Kavli ENSI director Paul Alivisatos joins Paul McEuen, director of the Kavli institute at Cornell, and Nai-Chang Yeh, director of the Kavli institute at Caltech, to discuss the future of nanoscience.

Students show off ‘autonomous vehicles’ at L.A. Drone Expo

Students show off ‘autonomous vehicles’ at L.A. Drone Expo December 16, 2014:

UC Berkeley engineering students joined civil engineering professor Raja Sengupta at the first-ever Drone Expo in Los Angeles on Saturday, demonstrating their “unmanned autonomous vehicles” to a crowd of some 4,000 hobbyists and enthusiasts.

Discovery advances ferroelectrics in quest for lower power transistors

Discovery advances ferroelectrics in quest for lower power transistors December 16, 2014:

A new study led by engineers at UC Berkeley and CITRIS describes the first direct observation of a long-hypothesized but elusive phenomenon called “negative capacitance.” The work describes a unique reaction of electrical charge to applied voltage in a ferroelectric material that could open the door to a radical reduction in the power consumed by transistors and the devices containing them.

Berkeley innovators named fellows of National Academy of Inventors

Berkeley innovators named fellows of National Academy of Inventors December 16, 2014:

Biochemist Jennifer Doudna, chemical engineer Jay Keasling and chemist Richard Mathies were among 170 people named fellows of the National Academy of Inventors. The organization honors innovators who have file patents in the United States.

Study reveals resilience of Roman architectural concrete

Study reveals resilience of Roman architectural concrete December 15, 2014:

An international research team studying the mortar used to build such Roman architectural marvels as the Pantheon, Trajan’s Markets and the Colosseum has found a secret to the material’s resilience. Led by scientists at UC Berkeley and Berkeley Lab, the team found that as the mortar cures, it forms a crystalline binding hydrate that prevents microcracks from propagating.

Berkeley innovators driving Google technology

Berkeley innovators driving Google technology December 3, 2014:

An article in IEEE Spectrum is shining the spotlight on the UC Berkeley connection to two of Google’s most high-profile innovations: self-driving cars and Street View cameras.

I School hackathon develops technological aids for Heifer International

I School hackathon develops technological aids for Heifer International December 3, 2014:

Students from across the Bay Area came to the assistance of Heifer International, which fights world hunger and poverty by linking communities and helps bring sustainable agriculture and commerce to areas with a history of poverty.

Vision-correcting display among Scientific American’s ‘World Changing Ideas’ for 2014

Vision-correcting display among Scientific American’s ‘World Changing Ideas’ for 2014 December 1, 2014:

Technology to pre-correct displays on computer screens for vision-impaired users, developed by UC Berkeley engineers in collaboration with MIT colleagues, has been named one of the top 10 “world-changing ideas” of 2014 by Scientific American magazine.

Center for the Built Environment’s 2014 Liveable Building Awards

Center for the Built Environment’s 2014 Liveable Building Awards November 6, 2014:

The David & Lucile Packard Foundation Headquarters in Los Altos, Calif., is the winner of the 2014 Livable Buildings Award issued by UC Berkeley’s Center for the Built Environment Industry Partners. Meanwhile, the DPR Southwest Headquarters in Phoenix, Arizona, scored with an honorable mention.

Faster switching helps ferroelectrics become viable replacement for transistors

Faster switching helps ferroelectrics become viable replacement for transistors October 26, 2014:

Ferroelectric materials – commonly used in transit cards, gas grill igniters, video game memory, and more – could become strong candidates for use in next-generation computers, thanks to a new, easy method for speeding up their performance.

Campus mourns the loss of David Wessel, pioneer in music and science

Campus mourns the loss of David Wessel, pioneer in music and science October 20, 2014:

David L. Wessel, who forged new territory in the arena of cognitive science, computer programming and music, has died at the age of 72. He was a leader in the campus’s Center for New Music and Audio Technology and its music department.

Photo slideshow: Student inventors do battle at Cal Hacks with photos

Photo slideshow: Student inventors do battle at Cal Hacks October 7, 2014:

More than 1,000 inventive students from across the country inhabited California Memorial Stadium this weekend as they sought glory, prize money and the sheer thrill of solving problems together in a 36-hour tech event, Cal Hacks.

POV: ‘Development engineers’ take aim at global poverty

POV: ‘Development engineers’ take aim at global poverty October 6, 2014:

A new generation of development engineers, “dedicated to using engineering and technology to improve the lot of the world’s poorest people,” is emerging around the world, write Shankar Sastry and Lina Nilsson of UC Berkeley’s Blum Center for Developing Economies, in a Washington Post opinion piece.