Technology & engineering archive

UC Berkeley debuts first-of-its-kind 3-D-printed cement structure

UC Berkeley debuts first-of-its-kind 3-D-printed cement structure March 2, 2015:

A team led by Ronald Rael, UC Berkeley associate professor of architecture, is unveiling the first and largest powder-based 3-D-printed cement structure built to date. The pavilion, “Bloom,” demonstrates the architectural potential of 3-D printing, its creators say.

Two UC Berkeley faculty members elected to NAE

Two UC Berkeley faculty members elected to NAE February 5, 2015:

Jonathan Bray, professor of geotechnical engineering, and Clayton Radke, professor of chemical engineering, are among 67 new members and 12 foreign members elected to the National Academy of Engineering Thursday, Feb. 5.

Study reveals how oxygen is like kryptonite to titanium with video

Study reveals how oxygen is like kryptonite to titanium February 5, 2015:

UC Berkeley scientists have found the mechanism by which titanium, prized for its high strength-to-weight ratio and natural resistance to corrosion, becomes brittle with just a few extra atoms of oxygen. The discovery could potentially lead to more practical, cost-effective use of titanium in a broader range of applications, including vehicles, buildings and bridges.

Bakar Fellows Program seeks early-career faculty pursuing innovative research

Bakar Fellows Program seeks early-career faculty pursuing innovative research February 4, 2015:

The Bakar Fellows Program, now entering its fourth year, is inviting applications from other early career professors interested in innovative research that hold commercial promise.

Scientists take big step in making graphene a viable silicon substitute

Scientists take big step in making graphene a viable silicon substitute January 26, 2015:

New research moves the wonder material graphene a major step closer to knocking silicon off as the dominant workhorse of the electronics industry. While silicon is ubiquitous in semiconductors and integrated circuits, scientists have been eyeing graphene ­because of the ultrafast speed with which electrons can zip through the material.

Q&A: Alivisatos, Kavli directors explore future of nanoscience

Q&A: Alivisatos, Kavli directors explore future of nanoscience January 14, 2015:

In advance of the inaugural symposium Jan. 15-16 of the new Kavli Energy NanoScience Institute, Kavli ENSI director Paul Alivisatos joins Paul McEuen, director of the Kavli institute at Cornell, and Nai-Chang Yeh, director of the Kavli institute at Caltech, to discuss the future of nanoscience.

Students show off ‘autonomous vehicles’ at L.A. Drone Expo

Students show off ‘autonomous vehicles’ at L.A. Drone Expo December 16, 2014:

UC Berkeley engineering students joined civil engineering professor Raja Sengupta at the first-ever Drone Expo in Los Angeles on Saturday, demonstrating their “unmanned autonomous vehicles” to a crowd of some 4,000 hobbyists and enthusiasts.

Discovery advances ferroelectrics in quest for lower power transistors

Discovery advances ferroelectrics in quest for lower power transistors December 16, 2014:

A new study led by engineers at UC Berkeley and CITRIS describes the first direct observation of a long-hypothesized but elusive phenomenon called “negative capacitance.” The work describes a unique reaction of electrical charge to applied voltage in a ferroelectric material that could open the door to a radical reduction in the power consumed by transistors and the devices containing them.

Berkeley innovators named fellows of National Academy of Inventors

Berkeley innovators named fellows of National Academy of Inventors December 16, 2014:

Biochemist Jennifer Doudna, chemical engineer Jay Keasling and chemist Richard Mathies were among 170 people named fellows of the National Academy of Inventors. The organization honors innovators who have file patents in the United States.

Study reveals resilience of Roman architectural concrete

Study reveals resilience of Roman architectural concrete December 15, 2014:

An international research team studying the mortar used to build such Roman architectural marvels as the Pantheon, Trajan’s Markets and the Colosseum has found a secret to the material’s resilience. Led by scientists at UC Berkeley and Berkeley Lab, the team found that as the mortar cures, it forms a crystalline binding hydrate that prevents microcracks from propagating.

Berkeley innovators driving Google technology

Berkeley innovators driving Google technology December 3, 2014:

An article in IEEE Spectrum is shining the spotlight on the UC Berkeley connection to two of Google’s most high-profile innovations: self-driving cars and Street View cameras.

I School hackathon develops technological aids for Heifer International

I School hackathon develops technological aids for Heifer International December 3, 2014:

Students from across the Bay Area came to the assistance of Heifer International, which fights world hunger and poverty by linking communities and helps bring sustainable agriculture and commerce to areas with a history of poverty.