Technology & engineering archive

Map of fruit fly’s active genes has implications for understanding stress

Map of fruit fly’s active genes has implications for understanding stress March 19, 2014:

A group led by scientists from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has conducted the largest survey yet of how information encoded in an animal genome is processed in different organs, stages of development and environmental conditions. Their findings about the fruit fly paint a new picture of how genes function in the nervous system and in response to environmental stress.

Colored diamonds are a superconductor’s best friend

Colored diamonds are a superconductor’s best friend March 6, 2014:

Physicists Dmitry Budker of UC Berkeley and Ron Folman of Ben-Gurion University show that color centers in diamonds, among the most sensitive magnetic sensors known today, can help researchers learn about the much ballyhooed but still mysterious high-temperature superconductors.

Scientists show which surfaces attract clingy Staph bacteria

Scientists show which surfaces attract clingy Staph bacteria March 4, 2014:

Berkeley Lab and UC Berkeley researchers are investigating how shapes and surface texture influence the adhesion of infectious Staphylococcus Aureus bacteria. Their work could lead to a more nuanced understanding of what makes a surface less inviting to bacteria.

Ashok Gadgil inducted into National Inventors Hall of Fame

Ashok Gadgil inducted into National Inventors Hall of Fame March 4, 2014:

Ashok Gadgil, UC Berkeley professor of civil and environmental engineering and faculty scientist at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, is among the 2014 inductees in the National Inventors Hall of Fame. He is being recognized for his innovative solutions for providing clean water in developing nations.

Art in Science: A Berkeley perspective with photos

Art in Science: A Berkeley perspective February 26, 2014:

The Feb. 27-28 exhibit, “Art-in-Science: The intersection of image and research,” drew record crowds to see sculpture, painting, photography, origami, multi-media and digital art by scientists and artists — now or formerly at UC Berkeley — whose works portray the artistic face of science. The exhibit was sponsored by Science@Cal and the EBI.

More Ph.D. students get sneak preview of non-academic careers

More Ph.D. students get sneak preview of non-academic careers February 24, 2014:

Scientists spend a lot of time crunching numbers to draw conclusions from data. And so it’s hardly surprising that Ph.D. students and postdoctoral researchers at last week’s “Beyond Academia” career conference were doing just that. “The likelihood that we will land tenure-track positions is about 10 percent,” said molecular biology postdoc Magda Strzelecka. “It would be great to have an academic job, but I want to be prepared in case it doesn’t work out.”

Gareth Thomas, electron microscopy expert and materials scientist, dies at 81

Gareth Thomas, electron microscopy expert and materials scientist, dies at 81 February 19, 2014:

Gareth Thomas, UC Berkeley professor emeritus of materials science and engineering and founder of Berkeley Lab’s National Center for Electron Microscopy, died Friday, Feb. 7, at the age of 81. Thomas was a leader in the application of atomic resolution to the field of materials science. He applied this to his pioneering work developing dual-phase, corrosion-resistant steel.

Seafloor carpet catches waves to generate energy with video

Seafloor carpet catches waves to generate energy January 28, 2014:

UC Berkeley engineers are developing a seafloor carpet system to capture ocean wave energy and convert it into usable electricity. The system could eventually help lower the cost of converting seawater into fresh water, easing the pressure during periods of drought.

CITRIS joins Newsom in launch of California Report Card

CITRIS joins Newsom in launch of California Report Card January 28, 2014:

How would you grade your state’s elected officials? A new app developed by CITRIS researchers in partnership with Lt. Gov. Gavin Newsom will let you voice your opinion with ease.

UC Berkeley psychologists tackle spats over disliked Facebook posts

UC Berkeley psychologists tackle spats over disliked Facebook posts January 21, 2014:

From Mumbai to Menlo Park, Facebook is swamped with complaints about “inappropriate” posts, each of which must be manually reviewed by an employee. Yet rather than take down the offending content, the social network has tapped the emotional intelligence of UC Berkeley psychologists, among other top minds, to resolve disputes over posts that don’t clearly violate the company’s community standards.