Technology & engineering archive

Research on the literal edge of 2D semiconductors

Research on the literal edge of 2D semiconductors May 1, 2014:

Researchers at Berkeley Lab and UC Berkeley have recorded the first observations of a strong nonlinear optical resonance along the edges of single layers of molybdenum disulfide. The existence of these edge states is key to the use of molybdenum disulfide in nanoelectronics, as well as a catalyst for the hydrogen evolution reaction in fuel cells, desulfurization and other chemical reactions.

Five faculty members elected to National Academy of Sciences

Five faculty members elected to National Academy of Sciences April 29, 2014:

Mathematicians Richard Borcherds and L. Craig Evans, statistician Bin Yu, molecular biologist Richard Harland and population geneticist Montgomery Slatkin were elected this month to the National Academy of Sciences (NAS), bringing to 139 the total number of NAS members at UC Berkeley.

Campus email scheduled for maintenance Saturday, April 19

Campus email scheduled for maintenance  Saturday, April 19 April 17, 2014:

Campus email services will undergo scheduled maintenance Saturday, April 19 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Users of bMail will have limited service during that time; CalMail should expect a service outage.

Map of fruit fly’s active genes has implications for understanding stress

Map of fruit fly’s active genes has implications for understanding stress March 19, 2014:

A group led by scientists from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has conducted the largest survey yet of how information encoded in an animal genome is processed in different organs, stages of development and environmental conditions. Their findings about the fruit fly paint a new picture of how genes function in the nervous system and in response to environmental stress.

Colored diamonds are a superconductor’s best friend

Colored diamonds are a superconductor’s best friend March 6, 2014:

Physicists Dmitry Budker of UC Berkeley and Ron Folman of Ben-Gurion University show that color centers in diamonds, among the most sensitive magnetic sensors known today, can help researchers learn about the much ballyhooed but still mysterious high-temperature superconductors.