Research archive

Berkeley researchers develop new standard for sharing neuroscience data

Berkeley researchers develop new standard for sharing neuroscience data December 19, 2014:

Berkeley Lab researchers have developed a computational framework for standardizing neuroscience data to assist data sharing among neuroscientists worldwide, much as the jpeg and TIFF standards have made sharing digital images easy. The researchers are part of the UC Berkeley, Berkeley Lab and UCSF partnership called BRAINSeed.

Students show off ‘autonomous vehicles’ at L.A. Drone Expo

Students show off ‘autonomous vehicles’ at L.A. Drone Expo December 16, 2014:

UC Berkeley engineering students joined civil engineering professor Raja Sengupta at the first-ever Drone Expo in Los Angeles on Saturday, demonstrating their “unmanned autonomous vehicles” to a crowd of some 4,000 hobbyists and enthusiasts.

Discovery advances ferroelectrics in quest for lower power transistors

Discovery advances ferroelectrics in quest for lower power transistors December 16, 2014:

A new study led by engineers at UC Berkeley and CITRIS describes the first direct observation of a long-hypothesized but elusive phenomenon called “negative capacitance.” The work describes a unique reaction of electrical charge to applied voltage in a ferroelectric material that could open the door to a radical reduction in the power consumed by transistors and the devices containing them.

New therapy holds promise for restoring vision

New therapy holds promise for restoring vision December 8, 2014:

A new genetic therapy developed by UC Berkeley scientists has not only helped blind mice regain light sensitivity sufficient to distinguish flashing from non-flashing lights, but also restored light response to the retinas of dogs, setting the stage for future clinical trials of the therapy in humans. The therapy involves inserting photoswitches into retinal cells that are normally “blind.”

Berkeley innovators driving Google technology

Berkeley innovators driving Google technology December 3, 2014:

An article in IEEE Spectrum is shining the spotlight on the UC Berkeley connection to two of Google’s most high-profile innovations: self-driving cars and Street View cameras.

Project uses tech to help boost vaccination rates in India

Project uses tech to help boost vaccination rates in India December 2, 2014:

As part of a project called Emmunify, students at UC Berkeley are simplifying medical record-keeping by storing patient vaccination records on a portable chip. The goal of the project is to make it easier for healthcare providers to access patient records without the need for Internet access, and ultimately to boost vaccination rates in developing nations.

Vision-correcting display among Scientific American’s ‘World Changing Ideas’ for 2014

Vision-correcting display among Scientific American’s ‘World Changing Ideas’ for 2014 December 1, 2014:

Technology to pre-correct displays on computer screens for vision-impaired users, developed by UC Berkeley engineers in collaboration with MIT colleagues, has been named one of the top 10 “world-changing ideas” of 2014 by Scientific American magazine.

Greater income inequality linked to more deaths for black Americans

Greater income inequality linked to more deaths for black Americans December 1, 2014:

Income inequality matters for everyone, but it matters differently for different groups of people, conclude the authors of a new UC Berkeley study. Researchers linked greater gaps in wealth to more deaths among black Americans, but fewer deaths among white Americans.

Arsenic in drinking water linked to 50 percent drop in breast cancer deaths

Arsenic in drinking water linked to 50 percent drop in breast cancer deaths October 28, 2014:

A new study by researchers from UC Berkeley and the Pontifical Catholic University of Chile has linked arsenic to a 50 percent drop in breast cancer deaths among people inadvertently exposed to high levels of the contaminant in their drinking water,

Faster switching helps ferroelectrics become viable replacement for transistors

Faster switching helps ferroelectrics become viable replacement for transistors October 26, 2014:

Ferroelectric materials – commonly used in transit cards, gas grill igniters, video game memory, and more – could become strong candidates for use in next-generation computers, thanks to a new, easy method for speeding up their performance.

How do chemicals affect breast-cancer risk?

How do chemicals affect breast-cancer risk? October 23, 2014:

Improved testing of the multitude of chemicals we encounter daily will help us understand if and how these exposures contribute to development of breast cancer, says Megan Schwarzman, a research scientist at the School of Public Health’s Center for Occupational and Environmental Health. She and two coauthors offer commentary in the journal Reproductive Toxicology.

Hospital mergers and acquisitions leading to increased patient costs

Hospital mergers and acquisitions leading to increased patient costs October 21, 2014:

The trend of hospitals consolidating medical groups and physician practices in an effort to improve the coordination of patient care is backfiring when it comes to lowering the cost of patient care, according to a new study. Researchers find that patient costs are significantly higher in hospital-owned physician groups compared with physician-owned groups.

It’s the Big 3-0 for the Berkeley Wellness Letter — and counting

It’s the Big 3-0 for the Berkeley Wellness Letter — and counting October 20, 2014:

In 1984, when the Berkeley Wellness Letter first landed in mailboxes, the word “wellness” was rarely used. Now, the culture has caught up with the UC Berkeley School of Public Health: a Google search of “wellness” turns up 464 million hits, and counting. And the Wellness Letter celebrates its 30th anniversary with a party and a burgeoning online presence.