Research archive

‘Getting-by girls’ straddle gap between academic winners and losers

'Getting-by girls' straddle gap between academic winners and losers with photos

August 16, 2014:

Everyone notices the academic superstars and failures, but what about the tens of millions of American teens straddling these two extremes? A new UC Berkeley study has spotlighted a high school subculture that has made an art of slacking, even with ample educational resources, and may be destined to perpetuate the nation’s struggling lower-middle class.

Map of fruit fly’s active genes has implications for understanding stress

Map of fruit fly’s active genes has implications for understanding stress March 19, 2014:

A group led by scientists from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has conducted the largest survey yet of how information encoded in an animal genome is processed in different organs, stages of development and environmental conditions. Their findings about the fruit fly paint a new picture of how genes function in the nervous system and in response to environmental stress.

Fierce solar magnetic storm barely missed Earth in 2012 with video

Fierce solar magnetic storm barely missed Earth in 2012 March 18, 2014:

UC Berkeley physicist Janet Luhmann & former postdoc Ying Liu report that a rapid succession of coronal mass ejections – the most intense eruptions on the sun – sent a pulse of magnetized plasma barreling into space & through Earth’s orbit on July 23, 2012. Had it hit Earth, it could have disrupted the electrical grid, satellites, GPS & our increasingly electronic lives.

Bancroft Library papyrus, an ancient Egyptian soldier’s letter home, deciphered

Bancroft Library papyrus, an ancient Egyptian soldier’s letter home, deciphered March 7, 2014:

A newly deciphered letter home dating back around 1,800 years reveals the pleas of a young Egyptian soldier named Aurelius Polion who was serving, probably as a volunteer, in a Roman legion in Europe. The papyrus, part of the Bancroft Library’s Tebtunis collection, was recently translated by Grant Adamson, a doctoral candidate at Rice University.

Colored diamonds are a superconductor’s best friend

Colored diamonds are a superconductor’s best friend March 6, 2014:

Physicists Dmitry Budker of UC Berkeley and Ron Folman of Ben-Gurion University show that color centers in diamonds, among the most sensitive magnetic sensors known today, can help researchers learn about the much ballyhooed but still mysterious high-temperature superconductors.

Scientists show which surfaces attract clingy Staph bacteria

Scientists show which surfaces attract clingy Staph bacteria March 4, 2014:

Berkeley Lab and UC Berkeley researchers are investigating how shapes and surface texture influence the adhesion of infectious Staphylococcus Aureus bacteria. Their work could lead to a more nuanced understanding of what makes a surface less inviting to bacteria.

Closest, brightest supernova in decades is also a little weird

Closest, brightest supernova in decades is also a little weird February 27, 2014:

When supernova SN2014J was first noticed in January 2014, astronomers called it the closest and brightest supernova in decades. Berkeley astronomer Alex Filippenko and his team found that it is also weird: it brightens faster than expected for Type Ia supernovae, which are used to measure cosmic distances. The finding may reveal unsuspected new physics inside these exploding stars.

Forever Valentine: Study shows marriage gets better in old age with video

Forever Valentine: Study shows marriage gets better in old age February 11, 2014:

Love, marriage, kids — and then what? UC Berkeley psychologist Robert Levenson looks back on his longitudinal study of 156 middle-aged and older couples in the San Francisco Bay Area who survived the slings and arrows of early wedlock.

Seafloor carpet catches waves to generate energy with video

Seafloor carpet catches waves to generate energy January 28, 2014:

UC Berkeley engineers are developing a seafloor carpet system to capture ocean wave energy and convert it into usable electricity. The system could eventually help lower the cost of converting seawater into fresh water, easing the pressure during periods of drought.

CITRIS joins Newsom in launch of California Report Card

CITRIS joins Newsom in launch of California Report Card January 28, 2014:

How would you grade your state’s elected officials? A new app developed by CITRIS researchers in partnership with Lt. Gov. Gavin Newsom will let you voice your opinion with ease.