Research archive

Vision-correcting display among Scientific American’s ‘World Changing Ideas’ for 2014

Vision-correcting display among Scientific American’s ‘World Changing Ideas’ for 2014 December 1, 2014:

Technology to pre-correct displays on computer screens for vision-impaired users, developed by UC Berkeley engineers in collaboration with MIT colleagues, has been named one of the top 10 “world-changing ideas” of 2014 by Scientific American magazine.

Greater income inequality linked to more deaths for black Americans

Greater income inequality linked to more deaths for black Americans December 1, 2014:

Income inequality matters for everyone, but it matters differently for different groups of people, conclude the authors of a new UC Berkeley study. Researchers linked greater gaps in wealth to more deaths among black Americans, but fewer deaths among white Americans.

Arsenic in drinking water linked to 50 percent drop in breast cancer deaths

Arsenic in drinking water linked to 50 percent drop in breast cancer deaths October 28, 2014:

A new study by researchers from UC Berkeley and the Pontifical Catholic University of Chile has linked arsenic to a 50 percent drop in breast cancer deaths among people inadvertently exposed to high levels of the contaminant in their drinking water,

Faster switching helps ferroelectrics become viable replacement for transistors

Faster switching helps ferroelectrics become viable replacement for transistors October 26, 2014:

Ferroelectric materials – commonly used in transit cards, gas grill igniters, video game memory, and more – could become strong candidates for use in next-generation computers, thanks to a new, easy method for speeding up their performance.

How do chemicals affect breast-cancer risk?

How do chemicals affect breast-cancer risk? October 23, 2014:

Improved testing of the multitude of chemicals we encounter daily will help us understand if and how these exposures contribute to development of breast cancer, says Megan Schwarzman, a research scientist at the School of Public Health’s Center for Occupational and Environmental Health. She and two coauthors offer commentary in the journal Reproductive Toxicology.

Hospital mergers and acquisitions leading to increased patient costs

Hospital mergers and acquisitions leading to increased patient costs October 21, 2014:

The trend of hospitals consolidating medical groups and physician practices in an effort to improve the coordination of patient care is backfiring when it comes to lowering the cost of patient care, according to a new study. Researchers find that patient costs are significantly higher in hospital-owned physician groups compared with physician-owned groups.

It’s the Big 3-0 for the Berkeley Wellness Letter — and counting

It’s the Big 3-0 for the Berkeley Wellness Letter — and counting October 20, 2014:

In 1984, when the Berkeley Wellness Letter first landed in mailboxes, the word “wellness” was rarely used. Now, the culture has caught up with the UC Berkeley School of Public Health: a Google search of “wellness” turns up 464 million hits, and counting. And the Wellness Letter celebrates its 30th anniversary with a party and a burgeoning online presence.

Three UC Berkeley faculty to receive NIH Innovator Award

Three UC Berkeley faculty to receive NIH Innovator Award October 6, 2014:

Three UC Berkeley scientists — Nicholas Ingolia, Michi Taga and Roberto Zoncu — have been recognized as innovators in their fields through new research grants awarded by the National Institutes of Health.

$4.5 million for big-data projects in ecology, astronomy, microscopy

$4.5 million for big-data projects in ecology, astronomy, microscopy October 2, 2014:

The Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation has upped its support of data-driven science at UC Berkeley by awarding three professors $1.5 million each over five years to pursue big-data projects in ecology, astronomy and microscopy. The faculty members – Laura Waller, Joshua Bloom and Laurel Larsen – were named Moore Investigators in Data-Driven Discovery.

What are the health effects of fitness ‘deconditioning’?

What are the health effects of fitness ‘deconditioning’? September 24, 2014:

What happens to your fitness if you’re not able to follow your usual exercise regimen to the max? Berkeley Wellness newsletter reports the latest findings on deconditioning.

Changing how we farm can save evolutionary diversity, study suggests

Changing how we farm can save evolutionary diversity, study suggests September 11, 2014:

A new study by biologists at Stanford University and UC Berkeley highlights the dramatic hit on evolutionary diversity when forests are transformed into agricultural lands. The findings point to using diversified farming as a way to preserve the evolutionary history embodied in wildlife.

Study links honesty to prefrontal region of the brain

Study links honesty to prefrontal region of the brain September 8, 2014:

Lead author of new study linking honesty to a certain region of the brain says the findings have significant implications for understanding social interaction and cooperation within business organizations and beyond.