Technology & engineering archive

Electric vehicle batteries last longer than previously thought

Electric vehicle batteries last longer than previously thought March 30, 2015:

Scott Moura, UC Berkeley assistant professor of civil and environmental engineering, has co-authored a study with Berkeley Lab colleagues that may alleviate the concerns of battery life in electric vehicles. After analyzing real-world driving patterns, the researchers found that batteries that have lost 20 percent of their originally rated energy storage capacity can still meet the daily travel needs of more than 85 percent of U.S. drivers.

Granholm announces launch of America Jobs Project

Granholm announces launch of America Jobs Project March 30, 2015:

Former Michigan Gov. Jennifer Granholm, an adjunct professor of public policy and a senior research fellow at UC Berkeley’s Energy and Climate Institute, has announced the launch of The  American  Jobs Project. The national initiative is focused on the creation of good-paying middle-class jobs in advanced energy-economic clusters.

Two new projects will search for dark matter axions

Two new projects will search for dark matter axions March 16, 2015:

Is the mysterious dark matter that makes up 26 percent of the universe composed of a hypothetical particle called an axion, instead of the formerly popular WIMP? The Heising-Simons Foundation gave UC Berkeley physicist Dmitry Budker and nuclear engineering Karl van Bibber funds to look for axions with two different experimental techniques.

With a tug and a twist, new chameleon-like material changes color

With a tug and a twist, new chameleon-like material changes color March 13, 2015:

Taking inspiration from nature, UC Berkeley engineers have created an ultra-thin film that can shift colors as easily as a chameleon’s skin when pulled or twisted.

UC Berkeley debuts first-of-its-kind 3-D-printed cement structure

UC Berkeley debuts first-of-its-kind 3-D-printed cement structure March 2, 2015:

A team led by Ronald Rael, UC Berkeley associate professor of architecture, is unveiling the first and largest powder-based 3-D-printed cement structure built to date. The pavilion, “Bloom,” demonstrates the architectural potential of 3-D printing, its creators say.

Two UC Berkeley faculty members elected to NAE

Two UC Berkeley faculty members elected to NAE February 5, 2015:

Jonathan Bray, professor of geotechnical engineering, and Clayton Radke, professor of chemical engineering, are among 67 new members and 12 foreign members elected to the National Academy of Engineering Thursday, Feb. 5.

Study reveals how oxygen is like kryptonite to titanium with video

Study reveals how oxygen is like kryptonite to titanium February 5, 2015:

UC Berkeley scientists have found the mechanism by which titanium, prized for its high strength-to-weight ratio and natural resistance to corrosion, becomes brittle with just a few extra atoms of oxygen. The discovery could potentially lead to more practical, cost-effective use of titanium in a broader range of applications, including vehicles, buildings and bridges.

Bakar Fellows Program seeks early-career faculty pursuing innovative research

Bakar Fellows Program seeks early-career faculty pursuing innovative research February 4, 2015:

The Bakar Fellows Program, now entering its fourth year, is inviting applications from other early career professors interested in innovative research that hold commercial promise.

Scientists take big step in making graphene a viable silicon substitute

Scientists take big step in making graphene a viable silicon substitute January 26, 2015:

New research moves the wonder material graphene a major step closer to knocking silicon off as the dominant workhorse of the electronics industry. While silicon is ubiquitous in semiconductors and integrated circuits, scientists have been eyeing graphene ­because of the ultrafast speed with which electrons can zip through the material.